Use Cases

Report – Georgia technology evaluation

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1.0 Purpose

Demonstrate the key innovations of ARRA’s Industrial Mesh technology

2.0 Feature Demonstration

Demonstrate the key innovations of ARRA’s Industrial Mesh technology

Demonstration Report Georgia img

Description:

5 nodes were placed in a radio frequency congested urban city environment where 63 competing Wi-Fi signals were competing for dominance in the zone. ARRA routers were challenged to establish reliable wireless connections in this difficult environment and deliver high speed internet across the busy district. The fifth router, almost 2 kilometers away up the mountain, was added to demonstrate excellent long-range mesh capability.

Demonstration Report Georgia img

Description:

4 nodes were placed in a rural village using backhaul from a local resident. Each router was placed a good distance away and made to connect with little line of sight through trees and other obstacles where directionality of the panel antennas had to be done with guesswork.

Several local villagers found interest in the test effort and joined in to offer their homes to the test.

Summary of Demonstration

Feature
Purpose
Results
2.1
Auto Configure Install
Show Automatic Setup. Power-on to operation without complexity
Empirically observed. Power-on, select ARRA Wi-Fi, captive portal, enter password, connect to internet, phone, email, etc.
2.2
Captive Portal
Show built-in business functionality
Presented Oct. 5: initial interaction with the ARRA network establishes the connection to the captive portal.
2.3
Self-healing Mesh
Network traffic automatically rerouted around downed nodes
Demonstrated Oct 6 in rural environment.
2.4
High-capacity Scalability
Five nodes under load with no signs of overhead stress
October 6 in rural environment, this reinforces the flexibility of the system when deployed.
2.5
Seamless Multi-homing
Show redundant auto-switching through alternate backhaul sources
Demonstrated October 6 by individually dropping intermediary node 20xx, and then 20zz without disrupting signal from 2010 to 200x
2.6
Deployment Flexibility
Deploy units around obstacles (hills/buildings) without costly towers
Demonstrated at both the casino deployment around the bar to the back room, and the rural deployment from the source (2010) to the node on the hill (20xx) then to the patio and the final node (20xx)
2.7
Long-range AP Performance
Show range connectivity behavior for end users
Demonstrated at the rural deployment by eight (12) users simultaneously playing video at the fourth node with minimal degradation from 27Mbs to 14Mbs
2.8
Long Range Capability
Show long-range node-to-node performance (site permitting)
1.8km from Mtatsminda Park to Radison Hotel.

2.1 Auto Configure Install

Purpose: Show Automatic Setup. Power-on to operation without complexity

This was empirically observed.  The following screenshots define the customer experience:

2.1.1 Following Power-on, Select the ARRA WiFi

2.1.1 Select the ARRA WiFi

2.1.2 Captive Portal

2.1.2 Captive Portal

2.1.3 Enter Token/Password or Get Voucher

2.1.3 Enter TokenPassword or Get Voucher

2.1.4 Payment

2.1.4 Payment

Then connect to the Internet, phone, email, etc.

2.2 Node Loss Performance

Purpose: Show node-to-node Throughput efficiency at 95% or greater

2.3 Captive Portal

Purpose: Show built-in business functionality

As shown in 2.1.2 above, the initial connection with the ARRA system from any platform guides the user to the captive portal.  We demonstrated this functionality as well as how to obtain a voucher (see screenshots from 2.1.3 and 2.1.4 above).

2.4 Self-healing Mesh

Purpose: Network traffic automatically rerouted around downed nodes

This was demonstrated in the October 6 rural environment tests.  We alternately powered down the second and third nodes (see 2.7 below), with no loss in connectivity at the fourth node.  As the third node was powered off, the fourth node automatically rerouted to gain its signal from the second node.  We powered the third node on, then powered the second node off.  The third node automatically switched to get signal from the source (2000), again with no interruption of signal at the fourth node

2.5 High-capacity Scalability

Purpose: Five nodes under load with no signs of overhead stress

In the rural environment demonstration on October 6, we were able to show high-capacity scalability with only four units.  This reinforces both the flexibility of the system when deployed, as well as the routers ability to reach more users with fewer units.

Four ARRA routers were deployed across

2.5_4-Routers@2x

2.6 Seamless Multi-homing6

Purpose: Show redundant auto-switching through alternate backhaul sources

2.7 Deployment Flexibility

Purpose: Deploy units around obstacles (hills/buildings) without costly towers

Demonstration of deployment flexibility was impiracally observed as we set up the individual nodes.  We adjusted the location of the source unit from the middle of the roof to the southern end of the house in order to have better line of sight to the second node which was initially located behind a stone house.

Source
2nd Node
3rd Node
3rd
4th Node 20xx@2x

2.8 Long-range AP Performance

Purpose: Show range connectivity behavior for end users

2.9 Long Range Capability

Purpose: Show long range node-to-node performance (site permitting)

Using conventional antenna’s we exhibited long-range connectivity at 1.8km from the Radisson Blu Hotel to Mtatsminda Park.  Signal was measured at 20Mbs at the Ferris Wheel, with an output of 25Mbs at the source.

LRN 200c 01
LRN 200c 02
3rd Node

Test Guidelines

1. Self-healing test:

This tests the mesh’s ability to re-route and continue delivering connectivity after a transit node has gone down. To test this, simply maintain a connection through the internet that shows a live session… like A live skype conversation. Assuming node A is the source of the internet and has backhaul provided to it, then the test should be done while connected to the AP of node D.

At this point, turn off node B and wait to see what happens to the connectivity. The mesh should identify the problem and re-route the connectivity through node C instead. In most cases, there will not be a disruption. If the traffic was mostly coursing through the downed node, then re-routing can take up to 100 seconds. Once it’s observed that connectivity was maintained or properly restored, the test can be repeated using node C.

2. Load distribution and multi-backhaul:

This test demonstrates the mesh’s ability to dynamically distribute backhaul resources across the mesh efficiently. No IP routing table configurations are necessary. It’s all automatic. To perform the test, simply add backhaul to any additional nodes in the mesh and observe its seamless handling of the resource. 

3. Confirm business model / captive portal functionality:

This tests the mesh’s ability to operate and respect the business rules that have been assigned to it. The mesh auto-provisions access control, business model workflow, payments, and taxation. 

  • Set the business model to ‘Hotspot’ and test the mesh’s ability to act as a paid hotspot network. 
  • Set the business model to ‘open’ and test the mesh’s ability to act as an open network with minimal restrictions. 
  • Set the business model to Monthly and test the mesh’s ability to operate a full-service ISP autonomously.

4. Test deployment flexibility:

The diamond pattern’s most obvious benefit is the ability to show how the mesh allows you to avoid the traditional cost & complexities of wireless infrastructure. Instead of having to build a tower to get line of sight connectivity, you can add nodes and create low-cost connectivity routes around obstacles. Mesh as a deployment capability saves enormous amounts of time and money. 

Mesh nodes can be up to 2 kilometers away from one another. This allows for convenient and low cost spreading of network connectivity with almost no planning or maintenance required. 

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